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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- get this -- the taliban? we have details of a disturbing new report. >>> the death toll is at 76 in the massive blast and shooting in norway. the suspect behind the attack was in court today, defending his alleged motives. let's bring in michael holmes from norway with the very latest. what is going on right now, 34r50i michael? >> right now, they just had this memorial march. a couple hundred thousand people marched with flowers from the city square down here to the cathedral. in court today, though, it was quite an odd sort of situation early on. the media thought they were going to be able to get in. the police didn't want them to come in because they were worried about him making a message to to possible co-conspirators. let's show you how the day unfolded, wolf. >> dozens of journalists from around the world gathered at the courthouse. the judge asked for a closed room. flart references made by the accused in his statements to police and to the court hearing have given statements that require further court investigation, including a statement about, quote, two more cells in
in afghanistan said today the focus of the war is about to shift away from taliban strongholds in the south and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and days later an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the cap all? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were sporp not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces who saw the crisis response unit said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of
is a real signal from the taliban and network they can go to a target right in the heart of the capital. if the karzai forces we've been training up can't defend -- they responded well in the emergency, we're told, but if they can't respond in kabul, isn't that a signal it's going to be a long haul, and maybe there is no legacy end of the tunnel? >> i think the reset of our afghan policy last week by the president was correct. i think it was long in coming. i was never a fan of the surge or the counterinsurgency doctrine. karzai is not a willing partner. last week this mumbai style shooting attack, it could have been worse. i would give the afghans a little credit, but it was staged by the hakani gnat wornetwork, protected group, protected by the pakistani government. that group comes over the border regularly, kills our troops and obviously now is prepared to shoot at big targets in afghanistan. it's a bad signal about how ready the pakistanis are to confront terror networks in their own country. >> jane harman from the woodrow wilson center, thank you very much. >>> and up next here,
projectiles to militias in iraq and giving long range rockets to the taliban in afghanistan. >> heather: nato ramming up airstrikes in libya largely under gadhafi's control. rebels claim they are gaining ground and pushing towards the capital. the u.s. is dismissing gadhafi's threats of attacks on europe if flay toe's -- if nato's military intervention does not stop. >> reporter: those retaliatory strikes a not happen in , but they are happening against the rebels' stronghold here in misrata. overnight we had rockets land six miles from where we are now many they were aimed at the port, a key part of the city. a city under seen. the only supplies come in via ship. the residents who are under seen have begun to take stock of what their city looks like. there is now a deadly silence on what was misrata's main drag. people walk through the rubble, survey the damage and see what little is left. >> we come back to see our houses, we found them destroyed. all things stolen. >> reporter: in the shadow of collapsed buildings crews work to pull new telephone cables and repair the destroyed intrastruct
several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotion. >> thank you. >> also, much has been said about the draw down. you and some of your men will be leaving in just a few weeks. how do you feel about that? because there's been, you know, politically there's been discussions on both sides, some saying it's time for the draw down, others saying not the time for it. >> you know it's very exciting for us. it's about time about time we start looking at a draw plan and getting back to our families. we've been at it about ten years now. >> long time. >> long time. and, you know, it's about time the afghan people start taking responsibility of their country. >> it is the fourth of july, i know you guys, you're able to have some of the fourth of july barbecue lunch to
for taliban. he came back to harvard, but in 2009 with the national guard unit, he went back to afghanistan. >> whoa! >> damn! >> i spent a lot of time with rout clearance units looking for ieds and we got hit several times and vehicles in front of me blown up. my vehicle never got hit. i was very, very lucky. when you run up there and pull open the door and see your injured buddies, you'll never forget that site. >> reporter: this time, back home, he began to explore the science of brain injury. >> what happens when the brain gets hit by a blast wave and slams up against the inside of the skull. >> reporter: with colleagues at northeastern university, parker built new tools to study how a blast affects the brain. it could be years before this leads to new treatments, but parker hopes that eventually will have a broad impact. >> concussions that your favorite football player suffers or the head injury you get when you're in a car accident and your head snaps forward or a shaking baby syndrome. these are all examples of nonpenetrating head injuries that can cause a traumatic brain injury. >>
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)